Acadamia vs Reality

Now, before presenting this, I must preface it with the fact that I am at present an academic, I work with academics, and I have a great respect for several of my professors, including some who I disagree with vehemently on political issues. That said, I am often struck by the academic propensity to favor abstract theory over real-world situations (at least in the humanities), to the point where much academic discourse proceeds in the face of actual real-life examples against it. (This is one of the reasons that socialism is so popular in academic circles.)

So, ISUB Vision has a fun little video reminding us of the tendency of much of academia to dismiss real-work experience in the favor of abstract theory. (Well cultured readers will remember this movie.)

ISUB Vision comments:

The vast majority of classes I had  were slanted towards the far left from one degree or another. Marxist theory is held up on a pedestal, the Marxists themselves are studied in such a way that is praiseworthy. Capitalists do not receive such treatment, in fact they are cut out and a serious discussion about the victories and blessings of Capitalism and freedom and our western culture, forget it. I never even heard the name Adam Smith in a classroom till I took an economics class.

[Editor’s note – I am aware that a beginning economics class assumes perfect competition with ideal governmental conditions for the purpose of teaching the basic fixed costs/variable costs/opportunity costs model, but the professor in the video tells Thornton Mellon, a highly successful and genius businessman who meets a payroll in numbering in the thousands, “that is not business” and is quite offended. A good professor who had real world experience outside of a text book would have said, “Mr. Mellon, you of course are absolutely correct, but this is just an exercise to teach the most simple basics and several of the complexities you mentioned are covered at the X00 level class.”]

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