Posts Tagged Volokh

Obama’s Approval Rating Down

Jim Lindgren at the Volokh Conspiracy brings us the latest Rasmussen results that show that president Obama’s approval ratings are down even more, and that the percentage of those who “strongly disapprove” of Obama is the same as those who felt the same about Bush when he left office.

When George Bush left office he was deeply unpopular: in Bush’s last month, according to Rasmussen 43% strongly disapproved of the job Bush was doing, while only 13% strongly approved, for a staggering negative rating of –30%. Rasmussen’s Thursday release shows that after 14 months in office President Barack Obama has achieved Bush’s 43% of the people strongly disapproving of his performance, but Obama is still 10% ahead of Bush in those who strongly approve (23% v. 13% for Bush).

Lindgren also asks a very good question: What would Obama’s approval look like if the media treated him the way they treated Bush?

, , ,

1 Comment

Fourth Amendment and E-Mails

Orin Kerr at the Volokh Conspiracy discusses an Eleventh Circuit Court decision (.pdf) that drastically reduces Fourth Amendment protections for E-mails:

Last Thursday, the Eleventh Circuit handed down a Fourth Amendment case, Rehberg v. Paulk, that takes a very narrow view of how the Fourth Amendment applies to e-mail. The Eleventh Circuit held that constitutional protection in stored copies of e-mail held by third parties disappears as soon as any copy of the communication is delivered.    Under this new decision, if the government wants get your e-mails, the Fourth Amendment lets the government go to your ISP, wait the seconds it normally takes for the e-mail to be delivered, and then run off copies of your messages.

In this post, I want to explain why the Eleventh Circuit’s position is wrong.   I’ll start by explaining the argument’s origins in postal mail cases;  I’ll turn next to Rehberg; I’ll then explain why I think the decision is based on a conceptual error; and I’ll conclude with some final thoughts.

An interesting analysis for anyone who is curious about law or privacy protections. Read the whole thing here.

, , ,

Leave a comment

Iran and Human Rights Laws

Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy comments on Iran and its constant violations of international human rights laws. And of the complete failure of those laws: Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Democracy and the Appeal of Socialism

Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy questions why socialism retains its appeal, despite obvious flaws in its theoretical assumptions. Somin references economist Bryan Caplain, who points out that socialism ignores basic human nature and offers poor incentives to work and produce. A number of communes here in America went defunct for that very reason – freeloading overtaxed the system. Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Lindsay Lohan Sues E-Trade over Milk-a-holic Ad

Just when you think you’ve heard it all.

Lindsay Lohan is suing the financial company E-Trade, insisting that a boyfriend-stealing, “milkaholic” baby in its latest commercial — who happens to be named Lindsay — was modeled after her. And she wants $100 million for her pain and suffering, The Post has learned.

The actress filed a lawsuit yesterday in Nassau County Supreme Court over the commercial that debuted during the Super Bowl this year.

The ad — part of a series starring babies who play the stock market — features a boy apologizing to his girlfriend via video chat for not calling her the night before. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

Leave a comment

A Brief History of the Pocket

Randy Barnett at the Volokh Conspiracy is apparently very bored. And like me, apparently is a nerd when it comes to obscure history, useless trivia, and etymology. And so, complimets of Randy, I present to you the excitement that is the history of the pocket. Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Eminent Domain and Payback

In a seemingly brilliant turnabout, the State of Utah is setting itself up to use eminent domain to seize land owned by the federal government.

Long frustrated by Washington’s control over much of their state, Utah legislators are proposing a novel way to deal with federal land — seize it and develop it.

The Utah House of Representatives last week passed a bill allowing the state to use eminent domain to take land the federal government owns and has long protected from development. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.